MPB is proud to be the world's most popular men's sewing blog!



Jan 7, 2014

DAY 3: The Completed Cap + Newsboy Cap FAQs!



I know what you're thinking...

How does Peter maintain such a youthful complexion?

The answer is clean living and generous applications of almond oil.  But enough about me.  Let's talk about my newsboy cap.

I finished the cap this afternoon.  This is my very first attempt and I consider it a wearable muslin.   But it is fully lined, has a grosgrain ribbon inside band, and a covered button on top.  I did not add a snap to the brim; I didn't think it was necessary, but it would be easy enough to add a stitch to secure the front of the hat to the brim if I wanted to.

As far as the size, I consider this hat to be on the outer edge of acceptable.  I know that yesterday a number of you were offended by what looked to you like a limp pancake hanging off my head.  I think you'll agree that with the lining, the cap has considerably more poof or do I mean puff?  Speaking of poofs, not just anyone can wear a hat like this but I think it suits me. 



The larger diameter gives it a more vintage look, and since I'm vintage myself, it's fine.  That said, next time I'll try for something ever-so-slightly smaller.





Here's how I finished the cap:

1) I sized a piece of narrow polyester ribbon to my head (measuring where I want the hat to sit), attached the two ends, and sewed it to the hat, approximately 1/2" in from the edge.  If the hat's edge is a bit too wide for the ribbon, it can either be eased into the ribbon, or the seam allowances can be widened slightly to narrow the cap edge.  I did a bit of both.  (Visible gathers are a nyet-nyet.)  This ribbon and its seam allowance will be turned to the inside of the hat.



2) Using my old deconstructed cap as a model, I cut my lining (out of the other free fabric I found on the weekend).



Then I sewed the lining together and stitched it to the inside edge of the cap.





3) Finally, I cut a strip of 1 1/2" wide grosgrain ribbon I had on hand and lapped it to the outer hat edge (i.e., the right side).  I attached it with a stretch stitch, not for stretch but because it combines a straight stitch and a zigzag.  (This would have looked prettier if I'd used a narrower stitch length, but it's very secure as-is.)  I then pressed the ribbon band to the inside of the hat. 





The stitches do go through the cardboard brim at the brim's inner edge.  (One reason not to use hard plastic: you might have a hard time stitching through it.)

I didn't use interfacing in my band.  Instead of ribbon you could certainly use an interfaced bias strip like my commercially made hats do.  The ribbon, which I believe is rayon, is softer, however.  (You can loosely hand baste the inner edge of the ribbon to the lining to anchor it inside, if you choose.)



4) I made a covered button from one of my covered button kits, and sewed the button to the top of the hat.





And that's it!







FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS:

1) Will you make available a PDF of your pattern?

Yes, eventually.  You could probably make one on your own -- the shape is basic:



If you have a 22" head, as I do, and since you have 8 pieces, if each piece has a 1/4" seam allowance, then each piece will measure 3 1/4" inches at the point where the hat will go around your head (i.e, the bottom edge, above the seam allowance).  It's all very approximate -- a lot depends on how thick your band will be, as well as your brim.   You must make sure that when you add your ribbon band, the hat fits comfortably.  If it makes your head ache, it's too tight.

2) You used cardboard in your brim.  What if it rains?

If it rains, I will take the hat off.  A little moisture will not ruin the brim; the brim of the commercial hat I took apart was also cardboard.

Commercial hat brim is made from firm cardboard.

3) How big is too big for a newsboy cap?

It's really your call.  Consider the following...

















4) What fabrics work best for a cap like this?

You can make a newsboy cap out of linen, denim, cotton poplin, wool, pretty much anything.  Fabrics without much body should be interfaced (sew-in or fusible).  

If you have any other questions about making a newsboy cap, I'd be happy to answer them.  I'm not an expert, but I can share what I know.

Have a great day, everybody!

42 comments:

  1. It's great on you Peter. Very nice and certainly it's a year for hats!

    ReplyDelete
  2. Cardboard? In NY?!? How about good old plastic canvas, which won't collapse or crease, is lightweight and waaterproof, and dirt cheap besides :-)?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. What is plastic canvas? The brim must hold a shape, be lightweight, and easy to stitch through.

      Delete
    2. it's for cross stitchers and other needlework

      Delete
    3. NAYY. Just posting the link for easy reading...
      http://www.darice.com/store/browse/catalog/wholesale-basics-plastic-canvas

      Delete
    4. Yes to the Plastic Canvas...it's easy to sew through.

      Delete
    5. Plastic canvas won't hold its shape. Buckram can be molded and would.

      Delete
    6. You should not be stitching through your brim stiffener, but stitching right to the edge of the stiffener, but not into it. Then it would be no problem to use a plastic stiffener, ideally from a three ring binder.

      Delete
  3. If the outer fabric is wool, it ought to be pretty water resistant anyway.

    ReplyDelete
  4. Re: Creating a PDF Pattern Peter if you scan the pattern pieces (and include a test square against each scanned immage + then email them to me I'd be more than happy to offer you my services (gratis) to digitize the pattern into a PDF file for you :) Should only take me a couple of hours tops!! My email is: sew[dot]incidentally[at]yahoo[dot]com

    ReplyDelete
  5. I use buckram in hat brims, the kind used for making curtain pelmets. It's thick and stiff, but is woven so can be stitched through. You've done a wonderful job of your newsboy hat! It looks fantastic :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I thought about buckram -- that's what they use for brims in my vintage Vogue men's hat pattern -- and I have some but I can't remember where I put it! I wonder if it would be firm enough though...

      Delete
    2. you can iron two layers of buckrum together with a bit of spray starch....

      Delete
    3. What happens when buckram gets wet? I think it becomes a soggy mess. Am I wrong?

      Delete
  6. That is a sharp-looking hat. As we say in French: Chapeau! (which means not only the literal hat but "Hat's off to you!")

    ReplyDelete
  7. You could try neoprene/stiff foam for the brim. I used it in my girls hats. It was stiff enough, never floppy and withstood many many many bouts of machine washing.

    ReplyDelete
  8. for the brim, how about two layers of buckram, maybe fused together with bondaweb, to give stiffness but remaining weather resistant, or even washable?
    Great hat, suits you sir.

    ReplyDelete
  9. Looks great, Peter and I look forward to the PDF! Hubster would love it!

    ReplyDelete
  10. I take my hat off to you, you're pulling off the cap look really well and it's not a shape that suits all faces. Somehow your first picture strongly reminds me of a distinguished Italian painter...not sure where I got that from.

    ReplyDelete
  11. Love seeing your work, as always. Thanks for the in-depth posts on this hat.

    ReplyDelete
  12. I am so impressed by your tenacity with this project! Really well done. It looks fantastic on you, and I love the found fabric you used.
    When you first mentioned wanting to make a newsboy, I thought of a pattern that I picked up over the summer, and there it is in your post - Simplicity 6430! (I have only made the visor, not the giant newsboy..)
    Anyway, thanks for sharing this journey in sewing with us. You always make me smile with your posts.

    ReplyDelete
  13. OK, you're gorgeous and it's an excellent looking hat. But I do think it's a bit too large. Just a little bit of adjustment and I think it's going to show off your almond-oil-youthful complexion perfectly.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Talk about your backhanded compliments! ;)

      Delete
  14. I'm definitely going to make one of these, but I think I'll just DIY my pattern. I think my heads quite a bit smaller than yours. :-)

    ReplyDelete
  15. "If you have a 22" head, as I do" Oh my gosh....just call me "fat head" mine is 24" - I may be a freak! Fortunately it is bigger back to front so I don't look like an alien. Ha ha. I guess I will have to make my own pattern now. ;-)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. So each of your 8 pieces needs to be 1/4" wider than mine to fit your head -- not a big difference.

      Delete
    2. Me too! To misquote Susan Silverman: 24" when flaccid! What about using Timtex or a similar product in the brim?

      Delete
  16. The hat looks fabulous on you, you did a great job. I also have a fat 24.5" head. Which is why all my hats were custom made during the Lady Di (we all wore hats) period. I buy men's hats for gardening as the woman's just sit on top and blow off.
    Great job as usual. Looking forward to hearing about the menswear sewing class.

    ReplyDelete
  17. Looking at the historical newsboy caps, I think yours is just the right size. It looks great! And free! (Not counting your labor...)

    Your almond oil, poof, and vintage references are slaying me!

    ReplyDelete
  18. I love it, and I have to make one. Looking forward to the pattern! I'm not sure what my head size is, but this is going to be my project after this white vest (boring, for a uniform thing) and a pair of pants. Woo hats!

    ReplyDelete
  19. I cut peaks out of a plastic water bottle

    ReplyDelete
  20. The hat is much improved from yesterday with the addition of the band and lining. I think I see what makes it read as big to me - the hats that I prefer (like the dancer in the theatre shot) panels are more flat against the head around the back and sides, the . Or in the photo of that adorable boy with Petey(?) the dog, the cap doesn't sit as far down on the head.

    OTOH, looking at the photos of you in the hat at different angles, some look big, others look fine. I'm looking forward to the pattern PDF!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. That IS Petey. The boy is Dickie Moore, who just happens to be married to Jane Powell. Trivia is my middle name!

      Delete
  21. Just in time for the frigid weather. I like this jaunty look on you!

    ReplyDelete
  22. You look so handsome in your new Cap, as usual your work is lovely.

    ReplyDelete
  23. well done its wonderful,I want to make a pork pie hat for myself,mainly in memory of my Dad who had one as a young teenager

    ReplyDelete
  24. Great plaid matching around the crown. Looks wonderful.

    ReplyDelete
  25. Peter Lappin, I so admire your hat. Have looked everywhere for the pattern but cannot find the .pdf or otherwise. Might you advise where to find it, buy it?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Never got around to posting it.

      Delete
    2. Well, I will try to duplicate what you did, hit or miss to be sure, but try I will

      Delete

Related Posts with Thumbnails