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Jun 12, 2014

Elvis pants FAIL or "Butt Not For Me"



Wadders tend to be few and far between here at MPB Industries (knock wood).

That said, I created one today trying to make the pants from McCall's 5119, the groovy vintage 70's shirt and pants pattern I picked up last month.

The good news is I used a cotton twill remnant and, since there wasn't much of this fabric and I knew this was a test, I made the pants as shorts, so the loss as far as fabric goes is minimal.  My ego, however -- ouch.

The curved seams on the rear and side came out great.





But the fit was terrible.  Try as I might -- and I did try -- I couldn't improve it.





They were no more attractive on Michael.



Normally when I make jeans, I sew the back center seam early on.   Any fitting adjustments are generally made by tweaking the side seams.  These pants don't have side seams, so they have to be fitted along the butt seam.  I'm glad I didn't bother with the front fly (pinned closed in the photos) or waistband; it would have been time wasted.

I may wash and dry this wadder the next time I do laundry to see if they miraculously shrink up to the perfect size.  Somehow I doubt they will.  Maybe the problem is that I used a Size 32 pattern and I usually use Size 30 and widen the waist a little.

In happier news, I'm nearly finished with my cotton-linen jacket.  Tomorrow I'll go button shopping.





I'm disappointed about the McCall's pants but I'm not heartsick.  The lack of back pockets (or deep front ones) made them less than practical. 

In closing, I do hope your projects are going better than mine did today.

Have a great day, everybody!

36 comments:

  1. Sorry about the wadder. I've learned that you just need to let those go. Nothing that you do will make them fit like you want them to.....and it makes you mad as hell that you can't.

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  2. I think you're probably right about the size of the pattern being off. Those side seams don't hit you in the right place either, they're clearly expecting a wider guy. The upside is that you're not a wider guy.

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    Replies
    1. Agree on the upside of this experiment. Thanks for taking one for the seam team!

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  3. That kinda butt works really well for full seat riding breeches though

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  4. There must be a reason that on the pattern envelope they are not showing the male model from the back, only the drawing! Sorry about your fail!

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  5. I like this design a lot and so I hope we'll see you give them another try.

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  6. It was a wadded week for me, too. I had several complete fails on small projects and many seam ripper sessions. Is it the phase of the moon or what?

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  7. I won't lie. I laughed out loud. Those are not a good look. That is too bad.

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    1. I'm afraid I laughed out loud too. It's not often that a wadder is so literal....

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    2. I too must confess that the sight of two creased bookies made me holler first thing in the morning, while sipping my java! It's too bad you don't know a tailor or design student who could assess the situation. But you're a wealth of creativity, so all is not lost!

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  8. Well I really wanted those pants to work. You have the aplomb to carry them off. I love how the jacket is coming together.

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  9. I wonder if the center crotch seam may need to be scooped out lower ? That may lower the crotch and remove the excess fabric back there.
    Pants really do take time to work out the kinks. I am still working on my fit after many pairs sewn. It is not a fail, just a step to a great pair of pants.

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  10. Hmmm.... notice that they show the back only in a drawing. The live model's butt may have looked just like yours.

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    1. and that may explain the odd look on his face!

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    2. I thought that guy looked sheepish for some reason.

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  11. Yeah thats a tough fit....pain in the ass to fix (literally). I had high hopes. I agree with lowering the scoop of the crotch, but is it worth it?

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  12. I'm with Gail and Jacquelyn. I think the crotch needs to be scooped. But-- maybe better to laugh and let it go!

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  13. I'd also be curious to see the grainline marked on the bum of these. I get the feeling that would be telling about the fit problems.

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  14. Too bad! I love the seaming on these. Weird that the yoke seems to fit so well.

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  15. Wow, that's a sensationally weird fit. I doubt it's all about the size, the wrinkles are just a bit too localized for that. I would guess it's a combination of crotch curve and inseam issues, made worse by the lack of normal side seams. Basically, that back pattern piece just has an odd shape.

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  16. Why don't you just take your proven pant pattern and cut and paste it into this pattern? It shouldn't be too difficult, especially for a sewing virtuoso like yourself.
    I kinda like these pants and I'll probably do just that myself.
    Marjana

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  17. It may help to scoop the crotch out some but the back yoke seems to be too wide/deep. I'm short so I'm always looking for ways to shorten without destroying the design. Women's patterns are drafted for a woman 4 inches taller than me but if I just chop off the bottom it won't look right. If you decide to try it again maybe you could lengthen the seat part and shorten the yoke.

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  18. They pattern pants like gloves, but not for thee.

    Hi ho alas, and crack for days.



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  19. I have to say I laughed out loud too! Thank you for sharing.

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  20. How disappointing, I've seen that same seam on women's pants of the era and always wanted to try it. I hope you attempt them again in the right size.

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  21. Washing them is not going to help. It's a bad draft since you don't usually have issue with rear end fit. Toss them and be thankful that you didn't cut them in good fabric.or invest much time.

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  22. lowering & widening the back crotch, and taking 1/2~1" or so from back inseam would prob fix that :)

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  23. Put them on inside out and see if you can have the excess fabric pinned out or marked. You might be able to salvage these or modify the pattern for a better fit. Fitting the crotch seam is the most difficult challenge with pants fir most of us.

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  24. Yikes! Well, better luck next time?

    "The lack of back pockets (or deep front ones) made them less than practical." Welcome to women's RTW. Ha!

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  25. Yes, I agree w/ StanleyM. Maybe you could try putting the pants on inside-out and then pining for a better fit. You might need a helper for the seat! Or grade the pattern down a size.

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  26. What a waste of a beautifully sewn curved seam. Butt I think you are right about the fit...

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  27. Never thought I'd see *your* tush looking bad. ;-)

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  28. Looking at these reminds me that some patterns are just not drafted properly despite their having come from a commercial seller. I think you should make your own pattern, incorporating the curve yoke into the other pant that fits you so well.

    Wonder how many people made up this pattern and tossed the result?

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  29. Just wondering if there are any stores you shop at where you look for vintage patterns? If I can make it to NYC sometime I'd like to check them out. Sites are also welcome.

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    Replies
    1. I find most of my patterns on eBay and Etsy. Occasionally the weekend flea market, but not often: it's catch-as-catch-can.

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